Oh My!


Let’s face it: the words “NASA,” “space” and “dinosaur” don’t go together nearly as often as they should

Robert T Gonzalez

Quote and image courtesy io9.com.


Conversations with Riley # 16: Giraffe vs. Hug, Tonight On the 6 O’Clock News

Me: Hey Riley!
Riley: Stay away from my giraffe…
Me: I just wanted a hug.
Riley: The giraffe is mine, you giraffe thief!
<squeaky squeaky>

True American Hero: Neil Armstrong

Neil Armstrong circa 1969

Neil Armstrong, a great American hero, passed away today at the age of 82.

I’m not old enough to have been around when Mr. Armstrong first set foot on the moon, but he still managed to capture my imagination and admiration. When we look back at what he accomplished, that he left the planet and actually stepped foot on something other than planet Earth, we can only hold the man in high esteem knowing that he did so with a computer with less power than any of the SmartPhones on the market today.

As a child growing up, outer space captured my imagination. Mr. Armstrong was a hero to many like me, people who will never have the chance to do what he did. He should be applauded for a life spent pursuing a dream that so many of us have.

Wil Wheaton said,

“I met Neil Armstrong once, at a dinner to honor Jimmy Doohan in the early 2000s.

He was not much taller than me, but he was a giant of a man.

I don’t remember what I said to him, or what he said to me, because all I could think the entire time was “This man has walked on the fucking moon.”

Rest in peace, Neil. Because of your bravery and your courage, an entire species will forever look into the night sky and see not a mystery, but a destination.”

Mr. Armstrong, you will be missed.

Quote of the Day – August 25, 2012 – Attitude Adjustment

Attitude is more important than the past, than education, than money, than circumstances, than what people do or say. It is more important than appearance, giftedness, or skill.
– Charles “Chuck” Swindoll

Liquid Sunshine

Please feel free to link this little writing of mine, but remember to give proper attributions. 🙂

The sun was shining brightly – the sky empty of any clouds. By all accounts, including the ones of the two children jumping on the trampoline, the day was magnificent. Clearly the children believed the day to be nearly perfect, but what the day really needed to reach that perfection was rain. And not just any rain, no. The day needed a downpour, a true soaking was called for! Being children, they had the answer. An Indian rain dance. They were 6 at the time, and had been taught about how the Native Americans would dance when the crops needed watering, and so that the crops would grow tall and strong. Being children, a downpour would make them just as tall and strong as the crops. So they danced. In circles they moved, bouncing on the trampoline. Hollering and laughing and dancing.

At first, the sky refused to acquiesce. In truth, though, who can deny a happy child? The sky, being tolerant of children (in truth is was much more than just “tolerant”,but the sky didn’t like for anyone to know), eventually gave in. At first, it was a single cloud on the horizon. Then, there were more and many. Clouds of all shapes and sizes. Suddenly, the children are met by the blazing thunder and the deafening lightning.

The rain had come.

For hours in child-time, the rain came and showered them with happiness and joy. They were happy then, these children. A boy and girl. Cousins destined to love each other as brother and sister. They were closer than most, and they were innocent of everything that happened around them. They lived, and they laughed, and they loved. And they were drenched.